Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Collins residence, 200 square foot dining room, Sarasota, Florida

Ian Collins, the client:     

“I didn’t want a big place,” he says. “I didn’t want to insult any of the things around it.”

Dale Parks, the architect:    

“You don’t want to decimate an established neighborhood with a gargantuan house.”

Wayne Eastep, Photographer:

“After Dale explained the concept for this project I knew it would be  to be a pleasure to photograph.”

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Entrance and Cantilever Dining Room


Ian Collins knows glass.  He is CEO of Novum Structures, which builds some of the most innovative structures using glazing in the world: Dali Museum, St. Petersburg, FL; The Palladium Mall, Istanbul, Turkey; MGM City Center, Las Vegas, NV, to name a few.

Architect Dale Parks knows design.  He works within a modern architectural vernacular. His designs have contextual integrity that shows respect for the environment within which they exist.  If I were to use hashtags to describe his work they would include:  #Modern Architecture, #Architecture meets Nature, #Beauty through Design, and #Design with Integrity.

Ian and Dale showed respect for the neighborhood by keeping the scale of the house within the context of the neighborhood.  The living a.c.square footage is 2,800, porch 500 sq. ft. plus  garage. The design solution also built on the idea of connecting the inside of the shelter to the nature outside.  Dale the architect and Ian the engineer and client created a successful relationship between commercial material – the large glass panels by Novum Structures – and a residential shelter connected to nature.

Read the feature story in Sarasota Magazine.

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Back of the Collins house with a view into and through the structure

Foyer, View through house,Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

View from foyer with view through the house onto the deck and pool looking west

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Living room, dining room and kitchen looking east

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Living room with media wall and fireplace

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Open loft office

Open Loft Office, Master Bedroom, Master Bathroom

(R) Staircase to open office and guest bedrooms (L) staircase to master bedroom and bath

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Staircase leads to guest bedrooms and open loft office .


Master Bathroom, Bathroom, Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Master Bathroom

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Point Supported Glass connecting glass panels at the corner of the dining room.

Clamped Glass, Modern Architecture, Sarasota Architecture,

Point Supported Glass

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Architectural Design, Architectural Glazing, Architectural Photography, Architecture, Dale Parks, Dale Parks Architect, dining room, Florida, Glass Architecture, Modern Architecture, Residntial, Sarasota, Tahiti Park

Front of the Collins residence  facing east

 

 See more of Dale Parks architectural design visit: Eastep Photography

 

 

Architecture, Art, creativity, Design, Interior Design, Sarasota, Florida, Art

Beauty Through Design, Architect Dale Parks

Gallery

Flower Essence

About the Artist and this exhibition

The signature characteristic of Wayne Eastep’s photography is the ability to express the essence of a subject.  His images go beyond representational pictures to touch the spirit of the subject, evoking an emotional response.  In this exhibition he turns his attention to the exquisite design in nature  and inherent beauty within flowers.

Eastep’s images are commissioned and collected internationally. They garner awards for books, documentary, and commercial assignments.  His intention with each assignment is to go beyond the surface and look inside the subject.  Photography for Wayne is both vocation and avocation. He is driven by a passion for the art of image making.

Exhibition February 4 – May 14, 2015

Sunflower

The sunflower an annual plant is native to the Americas. The flower petals within the sunflower’s cluster are always in a spiral pattern. Generally, each floret is oriented toward the next by approximately the golden angle, 137.5 degrees, producing a pattern of interconnecting spirals, where the number of left spirals and the number of right spirals are successive Fibonacci numbers. This pattern produces the most efficient packing of seeds within the flower head.

Flour Parlor

Opening February 4, 2015  6 pm to 9 pm

128 N. Orange Ave., Sarasota, FL 34236

Contact: Amy Nichols  941.993.8649      flourparlor@gmail.com          http://www.flourparlor.com

Hours:  Monday – Friday 8 – 5:30, Saturday 9 – 4

Art, artists, creativity, Culture, Design, Exhibition, Flowers, Interior Design, Nature, Recent Personal Images, Sarasota, Florida, Art
Image
Polaroid, Photograph, Image, Fine Art, St. Lucia, Interior Designers, Interior Design, Decor, Decorative Print,

Polaroid image on St. Lucia of a Rasta man and Rooster.

What camera should I use?  I’ve lost track of the number of times I’ve been asked this question.  I learned on an assignment for Polaroid that it did not matter what camera I use.  Creating an image is mostly about the way I see.  I grant that a particular lens or camera may give me a technical tool that helps craft the image.  When I photographed for Polaroid I was limited to the camera and film they provided.  The goal was to demonstrate that fine art images could be created using only Polaroid film and a Spectra camera.  These are two of many images I made for Polaroid.  The images won awards in a number of categories and proved to be successful in promoting the Spectra camera.

I learned from this assignment that creating images was mostly about the way I see and minimally about what camera I use.  There’s a saying among working photographers that “the best camera is the one you have with you”.  These days I always have my “smart phone” with me and  am pleased with the images I am creating.  I love the spontaneous feel of the images.  In coming posts I’ll share some of those with you.

Polaroid, Photograph, Image, Fine Art, Decorative Image, Decorative Picture, Interior Designers, Interior Design,

Polaroid image, Crete, Greece

Art, creativity, Design, Interior Design, Portraits, Travel

What Camera Should I Use?

Image
art, perception, abstract, mirror, sculpture, photo, photography, New York City,

Reflection of the Flatiron Building from mirror sculpture at 23rd St. and Fifth Avenue, New York City

Art in public space Singapore

Art in public space Singapore

broken mirror,nature, woods

Broken mirror in the woods, Sarasota, Florida

When I think about how we see, I sense that we look optically with our eyes and we perceive with our minds eye. The amount of information we see at one time is enormous. Our minds eye selects, filters, organizes, categorizes, defines, and correlates what we see, then creates meaning by integrating with our consciousness. Did I mention this is done in a micro second?

Art can frame and re-frame the physical world and help us see and think about what we often take for granted.  It presents  an opportunity to expand our perception and enter a state of observation and hopefully, awareness.

These three images that did that for me.   The broken mirror reflecting the surrounding woods was alongside the road.  The women in Singapore were having fun with a freestanding set of translucent and mirrored panels and the sculpture near Madison Square park in New York created segmented and reflected views of the iconic Flatiron building, the Empire State building and a tour bus along Fifth Avenue.

These images posit the question, what is consciousness?  They even challenge our assumption of what reality is.  Is it what’s in front of us, behind us, what we see within one plane or what we saw just before we became aware of what we are now seeing?  More often than not, the role of art is to raise the question rather than propose the answer.

Art, Recent Personal Images

Planes of Perception

Image
Nature, Recent Personal Images

Black Birds at the Break of Dawn

Black Birds in flight

Black birds in flight

Black birds flying at the break of dawn.

From the Fine Art Collection visit EastepPhotography to see more

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Kazakhstan

Nomads and Networks: The Ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan

 

Photographer Wayne Eastep at Kazakhstan exhibition "Nomads & Networks"

Wayne Eastep standing by his photograph of the Tien Shan mountain range in Kazakhstan. The Tien Shan are also know as the “Celestial Mountains.” The print is at the entrance to the exhibit “Nomads and Networks” at the Freer | Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.

Documentary Photographer Wayne Eastep with his print at the Arthur Sackler gallery at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

Documentary photographer Wayne Eastep next to his print of a Steppe horse in the steppes of southern Kazakhstan. The print is part of the “Nomads & Networks” exhibit at the Arthur Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

Nomads and Networks: The ancient Art and Culture of Kazakhstan

August 11- November 12, 2012

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery        Asian Art Museum of the Smithsonian Institution        Washington, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

Artifacts in the exhibition.                             Images from THE SOUL OF KAZAKHSTAN.

Wayne Eastep at the opening of "Nomads & Networks" exhibition at the Arthur Sackler gallery Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.

Wayne Eastep with Dana Masalimova, Third Secretary, Embassy of the Republic of Kazkahstan and William C. Veale, Executive Director U.S. – Kazakhstan Business Association at the opening of “Nomads & Networks.” Arthur Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian, Washington, D.C.

The Exhibition has been organized by the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University in collaboration with:

Ministry of Culture and Information of the Republic of Kazakhstan.                                           The Central State Museum of the Republic of Kazakhstan.                                                           Multifunctional Scientific-Analytical and Humanitarian-Educational State Enterprise “Nazarbayev Center.”                                        Ministry of Science and Education of the Republic of Kazakhstan.

A. Kh. Margulan Institute of Archaeology of the Republic of Kazakhstan                        Museum of Archaeology of the Republic of Kazakhstan 

The exhibition was made possible through support of the Leon Levy Foundation.

 

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Nature

Aloe Vera Stage 2

Aloe vera flower bud

Aloe vera flower bud

Nature offers a counter-balance to the hyper speed pace of our modern instant gratification lives.  Last week I posted an image of this Aloe vera flower bud shortly after it had formed.  I had thought, “it will flower in a day or so and I’ll post the image of it open.”

Well, mother nature had a lesson for me.  She’s not on my blog, twitter, facebook, linkedin schedule. It’s been a week and you can see the delicate orange color developing slowly at the base of the petals.  When the time is right I’ll share with you the image of the fully open aloe vera flowers. Wouldn’t these buds make wonderful earrings!

To see more visit: Nature Studies at EastepPhotography.com

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People who have influenced me

Ernst Haas’s influence on my way of seeing

ERNST HAAS

Abalone Shell, ©1970 Ernst Haas

1971:  The Creation, a book of photographs by Ernst Haas, transfixes me. The images are part meditation and part creative expression. After studying the photographs for days, I became aware of a new way of seeing.  These images go beyond the descriptive to explore a subjects essence.  THE CREATION cover is less about the abalone shell and more a metaphor for the universe. The shapes and colors suggest the swirl of planets and stars.  Having an image trigger associations like this has never happened for me before.  Ernst’s images plant the seed in my imagination of merging poetry and pictures, and eventually draw me to photography as a profession.

Five years passed before I took action to become a photographer.  The path I chose was an apprenticeship with Burt Glinn at Magnum.  During this time I had the honor of meeting Ernst Haas and over the next two years came to discover his grace, style and humanness.  When I started work on my first book, Bedouin, Ernst generously shared the following advice with me and that guidance proved to be sound and  I’ve continued to follow.

Read poems by children from the culture you’re studying, look at their drawings. Children show us a world drawn from their intuition.  Do not make an outline because it will become a structure that will define your process.  Simply start working and making photographs.  People around you will say, “Oh, you’re interested in that, well let me show you this.”  They will develop the story and it will have a natural progression.  Make sure you wear comfortable shoes.  If your feet hurt it will distract you from the experience.

Geraniums, Long Island  ©1961 Ernst Haas

Todd Weinstein, Ernst’s longtime assistant, told me a story about preparing contacts from Ernst’s photographs of World War II refugees.  Todd was making contact sheets from the two and quarter negatives and noticed he was placing one frame at a time on the contact frame and not a strip with three or four frames as is normal.  He asked Ernst why there was only one frame and where the rest of the images were.  Ernst answered,  “That’s all there is.  We couldn’t take a lot with us (when moving from the war front to safety) so I selected the one I thought best, cut it out and left the rest behind.”

Ernst had a creative courage that enabled him to trust his instincts.  He would embark on a project without a client funding the work.  There would be a basic idea, but no production plan or outline organizing the subjects.  He trusted the idea that the subject would show itself and share with him what needed understood.  Rather than imposing a preconceived idea he was open to discovery.

Ernst Haas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

© Todd Weinstein 1986     http://www.toddweinstein.com

Jay Maisel shared with me Ernst’s admonition, “One should move around freely and have fun, and if it isn’t fun then don’t bother.”

The style of Ernst’s work reveals a sensitive and intimate humanity.  His images were not simply documents of a person, place or object.  He photographed in a way that revealed humanity in a gesture or glance.  The essence of beauty is expressed in his photographs of a flower. When photographing a storm on the ocean he is putting us in touch with the power of nature.  His study of an abalone shell is not an image of natural history; it is a meditation on the mystery of creation.

Ernst Haas gave us an example of what we can create if we trust that fragile and powerful place within our mind called intuition.  We see best when we are open and responsive to the wonder of the world, as we were as children.  His example calls us to stop doing so much and start being.  Simply be still and see.  When we are in that frame of mind the subject will open and show something of itself to us.  What we learn will inform our images and what we create will be worth sharing.

Early portrait, Munich      © Ernst Haas Estate, http://www.ernst-haas.com/

Motion study of horses by Ernst HaasWild Horses, Nevada,   © 1957 Ernst Haas

To see more images by Ernst and learn about his life and contribution to photography visit the ERNST HAAS ESTATE  http://www.ernst-haas.com/

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